CCR

Cinematic Codes Review: ISSN 2473-3385 (print); ISSN 2473-3377 (online): features works in all visual genres, especially those with moving pictures, be they music videos, feature films, documentaries, photography, or just about any other mode or genre of art that does not fall into the realm of “literature,” which will be the primary object of Anaphora’s Pennsylvania Literary Journal. The other term in the name is “codes” and the intention here is to go beyond the simple summary or theme of the projects criticized in this journal’s pages to the codes and meanings that are hidden beyond the superficial. The third component of the journal is a dedication to reviewing and criticizing the arts, as opposed to applauding and viewing them. A great review should help artists to make better art by pointing out flaws. There is no such thing as perfect art, as all art is still in its infancy, and the last couple of centuries have seen great leaps in its evolution. There is a long road ahead for art, and it’s the critics’ job to take it in the right direction. Artists are not children that need to be congratulated on their mistakes. They should see profits in honest negativity, and the downfall of creativity in false flattery.

“Thank you for a very fair review of my show. You seem to understand it very well. Appreciate you taking the time to go through several episodes, not just the pilot. Many more good things on the way and hopefully the show will get even better. I’m certainly having a blast.” –Jack Maxwell, Host, Booze Traveler, Travel Channel

Cinematic - Cover - 9781533169082-Perfect

Reviews of Netflix Films: Volume I, Issue 1: Spring 2016: ($10, 114pp, 6X9”, ISBN-13: 978-1-533169-08-2; Purchase on CreateSpace or Amazon): This first issue of Cinematic Codes Review includes three film studies essays. Richmond B. Adams writes about an alternative perspective on Canon Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes. Trevor Seigler’s essay focuses on Paris as Antoine Doinel saw it. Finally, Michael T. Smith discusses subversive sexuality in Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove. The Editor, Anna Faktorovich, contributes a series of reviews of pop, art, documentary, series and other films she has been watching on Netflix with screenshots to illustrate her points. There is also a review of Livide, a vampire horror film, by Jane M. Kubiesa. The last section includes drawings from a widely displayed artist, Allen Forrest.

CCR - Summer 2016 - Cover - 9781537461243-Perfect

Interviews with Ripley’s, an Illustrator, and the Winners of the BFF: Volume I, Issue 2, Summer 2016: ($15, 6X9”, 236pp, ISBN-13: 978-1-5374-6124-3, September 3, 2016; Purchase on CreateSpace or Amazon): This second issue of the Cinematic Codes Review includes innovative scholarship and critical pieces. The essays include cinematic theory studies such as Felicia Cosey’s examination of paternal authority in post-apocalyptic films. Carolin Kirchner examines aesthetics in Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s work. Robert McParland studies value in Apocalypse Now. Keith Moser’s new contribution to Anaphora’s journals looks at the crisis of simulation in Black Mirror. Antonio Sanna looks at grandeur in the Star Wars series. And Barbara Gambini considers the cinematic effects in Pascoli’s industrial oblivion. The interviews section includes two interviews conducted by the editor, before, after and during her trip to the ALA conference in Orlando, Florida, with Mark Wayne Adams, the award-winning illustrator, and Edward Meyer, the Vice President of Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Their replies are frank, surprising and informative. For the first time, a couple of the interns have stepped up to help add a new perspective. Garrett Donnelly, a Columbia student, conducted a series of interviews with the winners of the Brooklyn Film Festival this summer. These BFF interviews are with Bentley Brown, Lou Hamou-Lhadj and Andrew Coats, Alix Blair and Jeremy Lange, Alicia Slimmer, and Claire Carré and Charles Spano. And Samantha Lauer wrote a set of reviews of films that she liked and disliked watching, offering some detailed criticisms for viewers and academics alike. The cover image is from Alicia Slimmer’s Creedmoria film, and her interview can be found amount Donnelly’s other BFF discussions.

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The Intersection Between Dance and Art: Volume I, Issue 3: Fall 2016: ($20, color, 96pp, 6X9”, ISBN 978-1-541227-40-8; December 21, 2016; Purchase on Amazon or CreateSpace): This third issue of the Cinematic Codes Review includes an interview with Barbi Leifert, who has managed to build three fantastic careers in dance, painting and reporting. She has exhibited across the country including at The Museum of Contemporary Art in London, and she is the Art Chairperson for the Tacoma Dome District. In the essays section, Richard Baker, Professor of English at Adams State University, compares Casablanca (1942) and Jean-Paul Sartre’s resistance play The Flies (1943). Christopher Boon, researcher at the University of Queensland, discusses the reception of the latest 2016 Ghostbusters film and its use of an all-female cast in place of an all-male leading cast in the original. In her now regular film review section, Samantha Lauer closely examines a number of popular and artistic films including, The Purge: Election Year, X-Men: Apocalypse, The Little Prince, Rhymes for Young Ghouls and several others. In contrast, Arvi Sepp’s two reviews of the complex, German experiments, Group Portrait with Lady and Goalkeeper’s Fear of the Penalty use a more scholarly approach.

CCR - Spring 2017 - Cover - 9781546734819-Perfect

Criticisms of Films, Past and Present: Volume II, Issue 1, Spring 2017: Cinematic Codes Review: ($10, 88pp, 6X9”, ISBN13: 978-1-546734-81-9; Purchase on CreateSpace or Amazon): This issue includes five film reviews from Cinematic Codes Review’s regular contributor, Samantha Lauer, which are illustrated with stills. There is also a scholarly film review of Ben-Hur from Antonio Sanna. One of the authors that previously published two poetry books with Anaphora, Jason Holt, made a critical essay contribution, with a study of Rocky IV’s training montage. Nichole DeWall, an associate professor of English at McKendree University, writes about two re-interpretations of two of William Shakespeare’s plays. And Brian Rowe writes about the intended victim in John Carpenter’s 1978 horror film, Halloween.

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